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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
to pose a different series of question about abortion and religion. do you think that changed the tone at the end? >> i do and i think that was her attempt to take the thing in a slightly different direction. it was like a one-two punch. she asks them about catholicism and then turns that into an abortion question. which was really revealing and an excellent moment for biden. >> jennifer: i thought so too, and especially since that was the first time in the debate that they were able to address issues welltive to women. does this vice president debate fundamentally change the race? >> no they never do. thing back to 1988 michael dukakis had a bad first debate and lloyd benson mopped the floor with dan quayle and we know how that race turned out. it is a 1-1 kind of tie for obama now. but it is going to change the outcome of the election i would be very surprised. >> jennifer: all right. let's look at act 3. what is the most important thing the president needs to do. >> i would like to see him say a joke or something about his previous performance. i would like him to re
of their religion. -- observent of their religion. and it seemed to me they were being asked to speak to a swing voter group which is very important to them. which is women. young women. of childbearing age. who are paying very close attention. >> we're going to see that answer replayed. or we may not see it. but through direct mail, through targeted online advertising, to women and other things, the obama campaign, that they have a new opportunity here with congressman ryan's sort of suggestion that i think he said something like we changed these laws through democratic processes or something. so meaning that there could be some type of a law. a change coming up here. so in the whole suggestion of the supreme court, which really hasn't been a big topic of discussion. all these conversations are going on in sub groups. so that is what's going on right now. is sort of this microcampaign. they know exactly, specific areas of interest for each voter and that's why they've been microtargeting things and things going on which we can't even see. gwen: and talking a lot about the future of the supreme
are a school, so we teach the art of gospel music. so it doesn't matter what religion you are. but i think that gospel music was birthed out of a need to be spiritual or to be religious or to have hope and possibility and joy in your life, you know, especially during those really difficult times. and it sort of takes us through a journey of our life in america, you know, whether you go from traditional gospel songs or slave songs or folk songs. >> vy explained that one of the goals of the program is to keep the spirit of gospel alive. >> as we audition people for events, we find out that they were not able to sing a whole gospel song all the way through. so, therefore, we felt that it was important now to make sure that we infuse these young people with the history and culture and let them know who they are and where they come from musically so that they would be able to pass the music on for generation and generation to come. >> by the end of the audition, these teens are already learning to let their light shine. >> ♪ let it shine, let it shine, let it shi-i-i-i-ne ♪ [ cheers and app
the process he used to create the human body. there's a view that tries to bridge science and religion. i know you have said in the past you are an obama guy, you're voting for the president. what do you think of governor romney's view? >> it's okay. >> it's okay. >> as i said, i'm not going to address anybody's religion. this is not what i'm talking about. what we do in science and critical thinking, you have a claim, an assertion. in this case, the earth is 6,000 years old or 10,000 years old. i can show any reasonable right that is not right. that's wrong. that's a wrong claim and it's off by a factor of a million. furthermore, evolution is fact. we can prove evolution to you. >> we're going to -- >> if you want to deny that stuff, you're setting aside what make hughes mans so good. >> we're going to leave it there. >> thank you. >> bill nye, say this and i mean this from the bottom of my heart. this has been the most educational four minutes in cable news this week. i appreciate that. thank you so much. >> while you're voting, everybody, take into account climate change. >> that's a separa
in the back of the magazine, from medicine or the arts or lifestyle or religion, did a lot of reporting as did the women in the business section because new york was the financial capital of the world. so we got to be reporting in addition to the fact checking. and it was a very collegial place. we were good friends with the writers and reporters. it was a patriarchal place. it was run by men, and the man at the top, osborn elliott, had this -- we're all on first name so we called him on his come had the veneer of being equal even though we weren't. but it felt very sort of collegial. and, of course, in the midst when i got there, the sex revolution was happening. there was a lot of sex at "newsweek," sometimes mutual. it was a great job to have. so in the late '60s, around 60, 69 the women's movement was starting to gain steam. we were reading about it, some of the women work in consciousness raising groups. i was to cover means of radical women, the red stockings group would only talk to women reporters so i was reporting on them. we suddenly begin to realize that this didn't just apply to t
religion. w w you have rebel fighters who are actively calling this a jihad. and part of the reason for that f that this fight has been going on for so long and the syrian people have paid such an enormous price that they really feel deeply disappointed and even actively angry with western democracies who they feel have simply left them to die. >> pelley: a story and a war with a long way to go. clarissa thanks very much. you can see the rest of clarissa's report from inside syria on "60 minutes" sunday at 7:00, 6:00 central time. who won this year's nobel peace prize? nobody was expecting this! we'll talk to the doctors trying ha save that 14-year-old activist shot by the taliban. and "endeavour" goes where no vouttle has gone before when the "cbs evening news" continues. continues. the way you want? u start the day can orencia help? [ woman ] i wanted to get up when i was ready, not my joints. [ female announcer ] could your "i want" become "i can"? talk to your doctor. orencia reduces many ra symptoms like pain, morning stiffness and progression of joint damage. it's helped new r
parking meter thing, you know what? religion aside, least one day of the week it would be nice if san francisco city government was off the backs of everyday residents. [ applause ] >> i like that. thank you. >> all right. next question. san francisco's transportation inserve drivers, bicyclists and transit uses. bicyclists are not charged for the privilege of using or parking on public roadways. mr. davis, mr. everett and miss selby should the city assess fees on bicycle owners to pay for transportation improvements? >> i don't think so and i will tell you why because the city is moving in a direction that i think they should be which is encouraging more people to get out of their cars and to get onto bikes and to use our streets and walk the streets. you know, i think we need to be visionary about getting and meeting our goals. we have a goal of 20% of all trips in san francisco being taken on a bike by 2020. the bike coalition, which is one of my endorsements, as well district 5 group have been advocating for this connecting the city plan, the bike coalition for cross town bikew
a pastor who is now bringing religion into a political conversation when you use comparing these people to demons. what do you say to the people who say that maybe this is not a place that the church should venture into. i mean, this is a political conversation. you should be more concerned about saving souls and leading a congregation. >> well, that's why organizations coin the phrase souls to the polls. jesus once said, render unto caesar and render unto god what is god's. we have government ordained by god. if you look at moses, he was involved in government. if you look at joseph, he was involved in government. all throughout the bible, i mean, in the bible you see strong personalities who were involved in government. it is a right. we must support those things that will provide the quality of life and will provide a standard of living for human beings. so, any time you suppress that, any time you take away that, it has to be demonic and diabolical. >> the last question, i want to talk about policy, aside from politics. and the president endorsed gay marriage as a policy. do you thi
to tell me what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. these talk about how you came to that decision. talk about how your religion played a part in that. and please there is such an emotional issue for so many people in this country, please talk personally about this if you could. congressman ryan. >> i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life or from their faith. our faith informs us in everything we do. my faith informs me about how to take care of the vulnerable, of how to make sure that people have a chance in life. now you why to ask basically why i'm pro-life. it's not simply because of my catholic faith. that's a factor, of course. but it's also because of reason and science. you know, i think about ten and a half years ago my wife and i went to mercy hospital in janesville where i was born for ourselve enweek ultrasound for our first born child. and we saw that heartbeat, our little baby was in the shape of a bean. and to this day, we have nick named our first born child lizza bean. now i believe that life begins
control. >> they are infringing upon our first freedom, the freedom of religion by infringing on catholic chirts and churchs and hospitals. >> reporter: the fact is religious employers are exempt but it does apply to, say, hospital that is serve the general public. on president obama's proposed tax increase? >> people making $1 million or more -- . >> reporter: the proposal rolls back bush tax cuts on people making over $100,000 and couples $250,000 a year, and we found people commenting on the body language. >> i didn't like biden's reaction. and he is constantly smirking and laughing and showing his big teeth. >> he is comfortable and knowledgeable. he seemed very relaxed. >> the body language is so minimal. contrived. they're in suits, come on. >> reporter: 50 million viewers watched the debate compared to 70 million who tuned in for the joe biden-sarah palin debate four years ago. john fowler, ktvu, channel 2news. >> early polling after the debate show that people were split over who they think came out on top. a cnn survey found that paul ryan was the winner, but the numbers were wel
and not to judge people by their religion, their skin color, their financial status, anything like that, with the acceptance of who they are. the world is only this big and that's how it is, because that's how you were taught. if we were so fast to judge one another, not really getting to know each other for what we are. i definitely did something that we cannot take two and listen to. [applause] part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and develop our team. because this is a group of guys about how my brothers. these guys don't ever ask about personalities or anything like that. they just put you in there and expect to get along. i was the only every 10 men of the group. so i didn't really care about it all, all the details, but i'm so excited i got to learn about afghanistan go there. what i learned is that these guys are the most important people in my life. we were there to support and care for each other. it didn't take a long time before the personality differences melted away. my pool team sacrificed their lives. we were running a mission and they took me out and rep
among marital partners, than religion? so my thinking is they push it out, on things like what do you think about gun control and abortion? that type thing. >> okay, so what about families, marriages, we have james carville and mary matalin, what about where they embrace different parties? does it happen a lot? and how do they resolve it? do they just live with it? >> well, it is actually rare, it is one of the most common things that couples share as a political affiliation, it has been suggested if they don't talk about it in the dating affiliation, it could be tough. and the conservative may just want to get divorced after that fight, and the liberal doesn't, because there seems to be more divorces. but the question people ask, if liberals -- will they become extinct, the conservatives generally acquire their rank through birth. but as people become more mobile, they move to pursue careers, get exposed, they become more liberal. so as a result, liberals acquire their folks through conversion, they convert to liberalism, i like to say some of the best liberals were born conservative
read the bible and the language, leaving aside the religion, just for the sake of the words that it used in the king james translation, first of all, it is fabulously well-written and secondly, so many of those phrases have entered into all of our minds, all of us, whether we have ever read the bible are not. we know those phrases and reuse them. and so, i think i am probably other -- every other writer has been influenced by the king james translation, more than any other. what i like to do when i come to manhattan, well actually it's the same as what i'd like to do in london. i like to go to restaurants with my friends. [laughter] >> hi. my name is bob. i read the eye of the needle and on pins and needles and i thought they were both superb especially the one about iran. your comment about lloyd george and communism, have you come across any similar commerce agents between franco and hitler as to why franco did not declare war on the allies after having accepted so much aid from the nazis and if so, could you put me in a direction? >> no, have never come across such a conv
religion or sexual orientation or how much money you have. and so, that is really about, you know, equal protection under the law. and we all want to see that in place. we want our judges and our justices to base their decisions on, you know, the constitutional law. and that's what they did. >> they said in effect -- >> that the government cannot deny rights to people based upon, you know, characteristics. >> including the right to choose your marriage partner. >> including the right to love whom you want and have a civil contract that gives you a lot of rights under our state laws. >> and they specifically, in that decision, said, "this is," as sally said, "a civil right. we are not talking about what churches can decide to do, whether they want to marry people or not. that's a decision, a religious decision for them." >> in fact, they reaffirmed religious liberty. they reaffirmed the right in the decision that churches you know, if this is not part of their belief and part of their creed, they have the very right not to do this. this is about our government and about, you know, civil l
. >> that's really beautiful. and that can be applied in any religion or any culture. >> reporter: the counter posters with the quote from the qur'an are scheduled to go up at four metro stops on or about tuesday. john henrehan, fox 5 news. >>> at least one member of congress wants people in our region to boycott metro over those controversial ads. democratic congressman mike honda of california called on metro riders to boycott the stations until the ads come down even though a court ordered metro has to put them up. honda has served six terms in the house and is the founder and chair of the congressional anti-bullying caucus. >>> a dire warning from defense secretary leon panetta. he says the united states is facing a possible cyber pearl harbor that could virtually paralyze the nation. fox's jennifer griffin has the latest from the pentagon. >> reporter: defense secretary leon panetta warning of the growing threat of cyber attacks against the u.s. >> cyber attack perpetrated by nation states or violent extremist groups could be as destructive as the terrorist attack on 9/11.
. not ideology or religion. it is driven by desperation. yemen's live in $60 economies. in a region that is cut off from the rest of the world, where people are living on less than 800 calories a day, that makes a difference. it is a real concern about government corruption that is pulling people into the insurgency in yemen. not drone strikes, not jihad, not ideology. all of those things are used. the second thing i found in yemen, they resent the drone strikes. they have the image of the drones and the u.s. government is standing up a government that is not accountable to them. we hear this over and over. in the south and in the north. this notion that the u.s. is propping up a government that is not responsive to the population. it is fundamentally undermining our political objectives, even while securing our security objectives. neither one of them bears any resemblance to the facts on the ground. they are distorting our ability to understand the relationship between the instruments of policy and the actual substance of our objectives. our security terms and our long-term political objectiv
't have any type of insulting to anything that has to do with religion in the country or whatnot. the structures they want to impose in society that people are not really going to go for that, and they are not going to be able to also -- the religious side, people want -- they want economic progress, people want jobs, end to corruption. they want more responsive governments for the society. that's not going to happen because you don't get that with democracy. you need a complete change in the way people think. you have to move from traditionalism to modernity. you put a thin layer over traditionalism. .. spur national sentiments and feelings that the americans want to keep you under the site and have no respect to for you. egypt is the greatest ally. every sin the astronauts of the 1972 war, when henry kissinger went to seize the.answer.both a map on the table and said the israelis on the side of forces and we will able to move our forces here. that is the beginning of an american egyptian relationship. >> in a sense, there is a defense treaty. >> a quick provost for camp david a
understanding of science, and when doesn't have to start about religion in a traditional sense. hand being forces larger than you, one of the great feelings of life. >> host: you get the question about faith versus technology? >> i get a lot in "the invention of air: a story of science, faith, revolution, and the birth of america". i don't get it quite as much. the technology version of this, a lot of technology futures the lead in the singularity that we are heading towards a point where machine intelligence and exceeds intelligence. and we lose control of the machines on some level. this is dystopian idea, in the terminator movies or utopian idea where finally there will be things smarter than humans that will be able, and that is the rhapsody. i get into that more. >> host: steven johnson is our guest and we have in our laps on at the 11 lebron in ohio, you are on. >> it is a pleasure to speak with you. if i could divert my attention for a moment. and your professionalism and tv rescues, and my appreciation, if you wouldn't mind. would you mind speaking on your work ethic. the you have
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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